Consignment store design that gets those shoppers buying!

August 9, 2018

This post was updated from May 2014

A few changes to your consignment store design can make all the difference

A fresh look. Sometimes that’s all it takes. By making a few quick changes to your consignment store design, you could increase sales.

Minimalism should be a 2018 resale trend

Often resale and consignment store design errs on the side of cluttered and overwhelming. Because you receive one of every item, displays tend to look jumbled and disorganized. People’s lives are filled with noise and distraction. Don’t overload their senses with your consignment store design. Group merchandise by color, style or category to simplify the overall look of your store. To make items appear more exclusive and curated, limit merchandise on racks and shelves. Make sure there’s plenty of room within the aisles. Read Avoid the “butt-brush” effect with these store layout designs.

Signage needs to talk

Barbara Crowhurst from Retail Makeover asks a key question, “Can prospective customers look at your store’s signage and tell exactly what you sell?” She added that changing the name of your shop isn’t what’s necessary. If shoppers can’t tell what you sell by your name, add a 5 – 7 word tagline that quickly identifies you. Never write signs by hand. Don’t make some signs in color and others in black and white. Be sure your signage is consistent on the inside and outside of your store. Read How to make the most of your signage – Infographic.

Shopping involves all 5 senses

It’s one thing to minimize inventory and easily guide shoppers through your store. Are you engaging all 5 of their senses in the shopping experience? Just as grocery stores use brightly colored produce in the front of their stores, you need to engage shoppers through pops of color and special lighting. Use a simple, familiar scent that matches your store’s surroundings and branding. Play ambient music geared to your target demographic to keep them in the store longer. Plus, brick & mortar stores survive because they let shoppers easily touch items. Whenever possible, let your customers enjoy a treat from you too.

Lighting is the #1 sales influencer

Successful consignment store design includes dramatic lightingWant to make more sales? Improve your store lighting:

  • Illuminate every corner of your shop
  • Create focal points. Repsly encourages use of incandescent lamps because “they’re sharper and brighter.” Dim the areas around the merchandise you’re highlighting to focus attention. If you’re using colored lights, “match the colors of your packaging or product to a light in the same color family.”
  • Light each shelf carefully
  • Brighten your cash wrap
  • Pay particular attention to your front window. A dedicated light track is perfect for drawing attention to your displays.

A hidden branding spot

​Don’t let the wall behind your cash counter be underutilized. Change the color of the wall to draw greater attention. If you’re renting, add color by buying canvasses or canvas drop cloths from your local discount or dollar store and paint them the latest popular color. For better branding, enlarge your logo image and place it on the wall behind your POS. Read 13 ways to improve your consignment shop cash wrap. Use this area as a focal point for impulse buying or marketing purposes. Most importantly, the register should never be a place for the staff to “just hang out.”

Be sure to look up and down

Believe it or not, your floor and ceiling speak volumes about the safety of your shop and your professionalism. Is your carpet worn and dirty? Does it lay flat? Is the ceiling clean and fresh or are you missing ceiling tiles? If so, negotiations with the landlord are a must for your success. Read 3 steps to avoid “Consignment Tunnel Vision.”

Deb McGonagle

I have been a writer for various forms of marketing for over 40 years. I've written my share of radio and TV scripts, magazine and newspaper ads as well as direct mail brochures and newsletters. Currently, as the Marketing Director for Traxia, home of SimpleConsign software, I've moved into blog posts, eBooks and website text. It's been an ever changing and ever challenging journey but I've loved it all along the way.