13 ways to improve your consignment shop cash wrap

May 22, 2019

This post has been updated and reprinted from Feb. 2016

Checkout. Cashier’s Stand. Register. Consignment Shop Cash Wrap.

There are many ways to name that location in your shop where customers come to make their purchase and you eagerly take their money. Remember, how you design it can make a big difference in your total sales numbers. Don’t neglect this vital part of the shopping process and by all means, constantly keep in mind it’s all about the ease and comfort of your customer! Here are 13 ways that you can improve the overall appearance and function of your consignment shop cash wrap.

1.) Add impulse buys

For whatever reason, women cannot resist adding a little something to their purchase. The items have to be small not only to save space on the counter, but to make the impulse buy easier. Consider store gift cards, travel items, lip gloss, small toys, mints or greeting cards. Ideally, the merchandise should be priced under a couple of dollars and no more than $10. By all means, make sure the impulse items you display on your consignment shop cash wrap relate to your brand. This is also an excellent place to promote your Rewards Program!

2.) Move the location

North Americans shop like they drive. Everyone moves to the right. That means the best possible location for your check out station is on the left wall or at least to the left of your front door. Place your best items toward the back and put a clear path through the store to your cash wrap.

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3.) Change the size

Believe it or not, the size of your cash wrap matters in the minds of your customers. For some, a smaller counter can psychologically make the buyer feel they are buying something larger and therefore more expensive. (That’s according to Paco Underhill in Why We Buy.) However, a spacious area can make the shopper feel as though they haven’t bought enough and should perhaps keep looking. The size of the cash wrap is determined by the size of your store, the type of merchandise you sell and at what price point. Use the American Disabilities Act as a guide for how much space is needed in front.

 

4.) It should always be EAST

This doesn’t mean on the east wall of your shop. It means it should always be Efficient, Accessible, Simple and Tidy. Anything else is just clutter to distract the customer. If possible, the only things that should be on the actual counter are the customer’s purchase, her purse, and your neat and tidy POS system. Not only does this benefit the shopper, it’ll make your employees job so much easier.

5.) Add a “Cash Wrap Specialist”

Either hire or appoint someone to be your consignment shop cash wrap specialist or supervisor. This person needs to be prolific in understanding your POS system as well as your hardware. They’re responsible for merchandising the cash wrap; keeping the area clean and greeting customers when they come through the door. Consider elevating the position with special perks or a higher salary.

6.) Upgrade the wall behind

The wall directly behind your cash wrap is prime real estate. Everyone who stands waiting to check out sees that wall. Use it wisely. Consider painting it a bold color and featuring your name and logo or brand new items. Use a slatwall (or slotwall) that allows you to easily and regularly change the display. You could even paint seasonal backdrops that can be interchangeable throughout the year.

7.) Change the lighting

Lighting needs to be bright enough for the customer to retrieve something out of her purse and complete the transaction, but not glaring. Set the area off with attractive pendant lights or soft ambient lights that sit close to the counter. How you light your consignment shop directly relates to the comfort a shopper experiences. Set the mood. Use lights to guide customers through your store.

8.) Banish handwritten signs

If you have any signs by your register that are handwritten, throw them away immediately! Not only does it look untidy, it speaks volumes about your shop. Professional shop owners don’t hand write signs and tape them to their cash wrap.

9.) Don’t use the word “No”

In addition to no handwritten signs, don’t have any negative signage either. If you must list policies at the register, find a positive way to state them. Offer printed flyers with guidelines and perhaps a sample contract.

10.) Improve speed

Today’s shoppers are very different from even a decade ago. They have little tolerance for long lines and waiting to check out. Now may be the time to upgrade your current POS system or adding one if you are still doing things by hand. I suppose this is a perfect opportunity to tell you to sign up for a 15-day free trial with SimpleConsign.

11.) Open it up

If your cash wrap closes the sales associate in, you may want to find a way to open it up. A more open check out system makes the shopper feel welcomed and comfortable. According to FitSmallBusiness.com, there are 3 main cash wrap layouts. Choose the one that fits the size of your store, your brand and your wallet.

12.) Cash wrap training

Train your sales associates to keep the cash wrap area clean and clear. Have a place below the counter for items like staplers, pens and pencils, safety pins, etc. When a sales associate finishes a sale, teach them to quickly put items away before they take care of the next customer. Eventually, it will become a quick and easy habit. Set a rule immediately that no food, beverages or electronic devices are to be kept by the register either. Instruct your sales team not to loiter around the cash register, but to come out from behind it and interact with customers.

13.) Have fun

In many instances, this is the last area your shoppers will visit before leaving your shop. Fun signs thanking them for coming in, special treats like a Hershey’s kiss or printed signs filled with the photos and quotes of satisfied customers offer a last chance to make a good impression. Remember again, it’s all about the ease and comfort of the customer…no one else.

Deb McGonagle

I have been a writer for various forms of marketing for over 40 years. I've written my share of radio and TV scripts, magazine and newspaper ads as well as direct mail brochures and newsletters. Currently, as the Marketing Director for Traxia, home of SimpleConsign software, I've moved into blog posts, eBooks and website text. It's been an ever changing and ever challenging journey but I've loved it all along the way.