Get back on track by rebranding your consignment store

August 17, 2018

Rebranding your consignment store isn’t as difficult as you think

For just a moment, stop. Take a deep breath. Slowly exhale. Now, step back and look at your consignment store. Is it what you envisioned? Does it reflect you and your personality? Are you selling the merchandise you intended? Is the look and feel of your shop just what you wanted? If the answer to these questions is “No,” get back on track by rebranding your consignment store. Don’t let the term overwhelm you. Rebranding doesn’t always require starting over. Often, it’s those little tweaks that get you closer to your ultimate vision.

Determining your strategy

Rebranding a consignment store doesn't mean you have to eat the whole elephant at onceDepending on your personality, there are 2 ways to go about tackling it. You decide which is best for you.

  1. Eat the elephant one bite at a time  For some, approaching a task is best done in small bites. You make lists and check assignments off as you go along. Smaller jobs mean less stress. With so little time available, setting a time frame for completion and separating tasks into manageable “bites” is easiest for you.
  2. Throw an elephant-eating party Dividing and conquering is your modus operandi. Not wanting to drag out the process, you want to get it all done at once. But, that requires divvying up the responsibilities. As Achieve The Green Beret Way says, “you find others to help you with it. This might be outsourcing, it might mean finding partners, paying affiliates, or even bartering your skills for assistance. Getting outside help with these big chunks will make it go much quicker and you will get the results you wanted while you still remember why you wanted them.”

Step 1

If it’s easier, think of it as a “re-fresh” rather than rebranding your consignment store. Move from the inside out and start with you, the consignment store owner. As I’ve said often, you are your store’s brand. Read, 6 tips to build your secondhand store’s brand to understand that people emotionally identify with people, not stores. Does your store convey your personality? Answer this question…”My personal brand is _____________.” If your store reflects you then move on to Step 2. If not, dig a little deeper. Here’s a free workbook that you can download that may help you. Your Personal Brand Workbook.

Step 2

The most important part of any consignment store is the merchandise you have to offer. Are you selling items that fit your brand or at least the brand you want to become? The items you sell need to be curated according to your brand. Make a clear list of the merchandise you are willing to accept and items you won’t accept. Read How to tweak your consignment acceptance policy.  Be willing to offend some customers and consignors when items don’t meet your new standards. Reward your top consignors who consistently bring you items that fit your image. Move merchandise out quickly that doesn’t meet your brand standards and begin building new stock.

Step 3

Take a close look at your physical store. It also needs to reflect your brand. If it doesn’t, start researching other locations in neighborhoods that more closely fit you and the clientele you want. If you’re in the right area, check to make sure the look and feel of your store is in line. A fresh coat of paint in a new color may be all you need to add that brand identity. Read How your secondhand store can use color to sell more.

Step 4

Although a bit more challenging, take a closer look at your marketing efforts. A logo change is a big commitment. Perhaps it’s something as simple as adding a new tag line. Slowly begin to create marketing pieces that better reflect your store’s brand. Changes to your website can also be made slowly. New blog posts and a different style of photography reflect the new you. Or, your emails can take on a fun, zippy pizzazz they’ve not had before.

One last important point

Rebranding your consignment store should never be done lightly. As Business News Daily adds, “The ultimate goal of any rebrand should be to grow the company by better serving your customers. Sometimes that requires putting client services ahead of the rebrand. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing.”

Deb McGonagle

I have been a writer for various forms of marketing for over 40 years. I've written my share of radio and TV scripts, magazine and newspaper ads as well as direct mail brochures and newsletters. Currently, as the Marketing Coordinator for Traxia, home of SimpleConsign software, I've moved into blog posts, eBooks and website text. It's been an ever changing and ever challenging journey but I've loved it all along the way.